Thursday, August 31, 2017

A girl, her dog, and her mom

Sometimes, when your mother has been working on getting school ready for most of the day, and you really, really, really want to start school, you just need to go and do a bit of exploring.


Note the explorer's bad slung over her shoulder, complete with explorer's notebook for making notes and marking maps.





Pausing to rest, get a drink, and

catch up with the note taking.




L. is a good noticer, and discovered this large stick bug in the path.



She then named that particular bit of path, "Stick Bug Pass".

On the way home. Note the more drooping shoulders of a tired girl.




The old cherry tree that G. and L. have named, "The Hollow".


Dang Japanese beetles


And I'm not entirely sure these peaches will actually ripen. We're still waiting.

Upon arriving home, L. went to play nicely with siblings, and equilibrium was restored for a while.


Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Children and motivation

How can I help my child become motivated? It's a question that I see come up a lot, and it doesn't seem to matter if you are homeschooling or not. The trouble with answering this question is that the question can mean different things to different people. It's not a straight-forward thing.

'How can I help my child become motivated?' can mean 'How can I get him to work independently?' Or it can mean, 'How can I help my child work diligently and not get distracted and waste time?' Or it can mean, 'How can I get her to care about things and take time with them?' And oftentimes, underneath all those different question is the real issue of, 'How can I get my child to do what I want and when I want it?' That doesn't always sound so complimentary to the parent, though.

There are really two issues here. One is of distractability and the other is of cooperation. Let's start with cooperation. I find that it is the rare child who is not motivated. (My R. is one of these. You can't be motivated with no internal life, but even then there are still a few things which really do motivate her... food, hugs, and her baby doll.) If a child is interested in something, they are usually motivated to pursue it. If you have a Lego-obsessed child, you know what this motivation looks like. They eat, live, breath, and discuss Legos endlessly. You cannot stop them from doing the whole Lego-thing. You wish you could stop them from doing the whole Lego-thing. Other children have other interests which they pursue with absolute zeal. Usually though, what a child's interests are and the areas where they are motivated to dig deep and work hard, are not the same interests that we parents wish they would pursue. Doing homework or other assigned by adult tasks are often not on the child's short list of interests.

So how to get a child interested in doing parent approved and appreciated school work? I can only speak to the homeschooling side of things here, because that is what I know and what I have experience with. This is also one of those areas where I think it is much easier to be a homeschooler. While there are things that I think my children really do need to know, and I make them non-negotiable (and no, my children tend to not enjoy them, but one really does need math skills. Writing grammatically correct sentences is also a need in my book, as is legible handwriting), there are so many other things that can be negotiable. It's why boxed curricula and I just do not get along very well. They provide no flexibility for me to tailor what we learn to what is academically satisfying to my children. (Plus they also tend to be filled with busy work.) It is so much easier to work with a child's desires and interests than to work against them.

I find this teaming up to be beneficial in other ways, too. It tells your child that you really do care about their opinions. It puts you in their corner. It helps your relationship which really does filter into every other aspect of your life together. My children put up with my shoulds, because I also give them a lot of what they want. Of course you can find ways to incorporate Legos or blocks or toy cars or whatever into your child's work. If a child is balking at what you are asking her to do, take a step back and think about why you are asking. Also think about the balance of power. Are you only ever asking a child to do what you want without taking that child's interests and desires into account? How would you feel if your boss did this to you at work? We are so often willing to treat our children in ways that we would never put up with in the adult world.

The second aspect of motivation is one of attention and distraction. Parents wonder how they can help keep their child motivated, as in how they can keep that child on track through the school day. My first thought about this is to wonder if what of being asked of the child is actually developmentally possible due to the age and maturity of the child. Is the child being asked to do something that they just aren't capable of at the moment? Even if the parent would really, really like them to be more independent.

From my experience, it isn't until a child is in the high school age range that they have the cognitive skills to manage their time and keep to a schedule. In the ages leading up to that, I certainly do things which help them start developing these skills, but it takes a lot of parental management to work to a point when it doesn't take a lot of parental management. So my first hint is to check your expectations. It just might be that your child cannot manage a really long checklist at this point... or any checklist... or just working without someone to remind him that what he should be doing is working.

Next, children need breaks. Some children need a lot of breaks. Some children need a lot of breaks with a lot of protein snacks mixed in. And some children need all of this plus a chance to do some large muscle movement in between. A child who can work off some energy and let her brain rest every 20 to 30 minutes or so is a child who will be more focused and easier to live with. Aren't we all supposed to get up and move around every 20 minutes or so now, anyway?

Children who are particularly fidgety will need some extra support. I love our Time Timer. It is a visual timer which shows in red how much time is left for whatever you set it for. A child can visually see the time getting smaller. I believe this helps in two ways. First, it shows the child in a really easy to understand way, how much time for something is left. The bright color does not need to be translated from numbers to something meaningful... it is meaningful right away. Second, it shows the child that this current torture (whatever it is perceived to be) will not last forever. If there is an ending time, I find my children to be much more willing to work, because they can see the end. It is the unknown, 'forever-ness' of something that can cause a child to drag his feet. He thinks, "Why should I work? I'm going to be doing this forever anyway." Children are not good at seeing that if they just buckled down and got something done, that would be it. They live too much in the present, and can only imagine what they are doing then.

Another good fidgety help is a sitting disk or some other cushioned seat that provides sensory input. I find the difference between using one and not to be pretty substantial for some of my children. Or you could let the child work standing up or on a balance ball. I've even had a child complete an entire math page while jumping up and down. There is no rule which says all schoolwork must be completed sitting at a desk or table with no breaks, or it doesn't count.

There are endless ideas of helping distracted students on the internet, so I really don't need to go into all of them. The point really is, figure out what needs your child has, and help meet them. Even if it means leaving your own personal comfort zone a bit.

Finally, one last thing to consider. If your child is taking what you consider to be far too long to do the work which is assigned, I would ask yourself, does he need to do it? Or does he need as much of it? Could every other problem, or every third problem suffice? If she understands how to work the math problems, does she even need to do that much? Is there something intrinsically beneficial about this particular work, or is the child being asked to do it merely because it comes next in the book and is there? More is not always better, more is sometimes just more.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Invisible

I think I have finally been able to figure out what has been hard about this move. Don't get me wrong; there has been plenty of good stuff. J. and I are enjoying the feeling of not having the albatross of too high taxes combined with the second albatross of a house we cannot afford to fix weighing us down. We love the beauty of the area where we are living. We love that J.'s commute is so much shorter and that he is still enjoying his job and finding it both doable and challenging all at the same time. I have found things for the various children to replace what we left, so they are feeling more settled. The house is pretty close to being organized and livable and I'm in the process of giving away the last of the packing boxes. This is all pretty good for being here just over two months.

And yet...

For me, at least, it still has the vague feeling of being temporary; of being out of place and not quite settled. I knew that leaving a place I had lived for nearly 30 years, where I knew a lot of people, would not be replaced over night. But since I'm a bit of a research junkie, figuring out where to find things and do things didn't seem all that overwhelming. Tedious sometimes, perhaps, but doable. What I wasn't expecting to be missing was the sense of history. That would be both the knowing the stories of the people and places I was in contact with, but also those people knowing my stories. I'm used to walking into a store, the clerk seeing my last name, and asking if I was related to Gail Curry, my mother-in-law (who did know everyone.) While this happened less and less often over the years, it still happened enough to make me feel a little bit connected to her even though she passed away over 11 years ago.

I'm used to knowing enough people that when I say I have vacancies in my piano studio that word-of-mouth works and I can fill those spots.

I'm used to walking into a group of people, and usually knowing at least one other person.

I'm used to walking into church and pretty much knowing everyone... or at least they knew who I was. (It is kind of hard to not be known when you travel with so many children.)

I realize that I am very used to not being anonymous, and that is kind of what I am now, even when I have my children with me. It has been a little odd that the Great Dane puppy has received more public comment than the fact I have nearly a dozen children in tow. I don't usually look for public comment, but at least in this season, it would go a long way towards helping me feel a little less invisible.

Because invisible is pretty much how I feel.

I know it really is just for a season. We will get to know people; we will create a joint history together; we will learn each others stories. It is a lengthy and time-consuming process, though. I don't want to think about how old I will be by the time I have recreated 30 years of shared history here.

This has also highlighted how much I don't fit into typical categories. I'm not an empty-nester, though I have two children grown and out of the house. I still have little ones at home, so am not as free with my time as they are. While I'm a parent of teens, I'm not overly excited by joining a 'mom of teens' group. These tend to be a little on the fearful side about saving our teens from the big, bad world, and I have learned to be wary of overly simplistic parenting check lists. A group for moms of younger children? Well, I do have those, but I have learned the hard way that by having adult children and teen children and so many children, that my mere presence feels overwhelming to many new moms. Trust me on this. I have shut down more than a few conversations that were happily rolling along just by answering the question of how many children I have. This not fitting in business is nothing new, but it is certainly highlighted for me right now, particularly since groups such as these are truly one of the most effective ways that mothers get to know one another.

In a sense, I feel as though not only am I invisible now, but I have also lost my voice. At least a voice that anyone wants to read. And for a writer, this is not a really terrific thing. A writer without an audience is a frustrated being. (And I was never very good a just keeping a personal journal. If no one was going to read it, I just couldn't get up the gumption to write.)

Multiple paragraphs of navel gazing is probably more than enough. For those of you who have moved often, you have my sincerest admiration. It's tough.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Studio progress

Yesterday, J. finished the last shelf in the closet in the studio. This means that aside from the actual sewing area which needs a counter made for my machines, the room is done. Everything is stowed away. I wasn't quite sure that it was going to be possible, but we seem to have made it work. Want to see? Here's the view of the closet from the door. The fabric shelves I showed you a while ago are on the left.


The shelves straight ahead, hold general craft supplies, plus my book binding tools.


Then to the right are the knitting, crochet, and embroidery things. I love how these shelves look with all my yarn tucked in by color.



The very top holds the amazing amount of stuffing I discovered I own, plus all my serger bobbins.


The other thing that the closet holds is all my hand spinning equipment. I was kind of excited to be able to get out my spinning wheel again. It has been a very long time since I have done anything with it.


In all of my cleaning out and sorting, I came across several skeins of yarn that I spun. I did far more than I remember doing, and it doesn't look half bad, if you ask me. Think what actual practice could do! I'm excited to regain these skills.





As we've had various adult children here, and as J. and I have talked, I think our question of allocation of funds is leaning rather heavily towards stable, fence, and animals over kitchen and dining room. There is a part of me that really needs to have a horse. We've also batted around the idea of other animals as well. (I know this doesn't surprise any of my long time readers. We like animals around here.) Sheep are looking to be a close second to the horse(s). I will admit that having sheep for fiber is very appealing to me.

And then when your children huddle together to do some research and come up with this little gem of a sheep, well in some ways a fancier kitchen doesn't seem quite as important. It seems that Babydoll Southdown sheep are perfect for hand spinners, with a micron range similar to cashmere. And they're cute!

While I would love a prettier and more functional kitchen as well as a bigger dining room, this decision about priorities just feels better.

Saturday, August 26, 2017

Looking for the humor

Sometimes you have to take the funny aspects of life where you can find them. I am actually still chuckling about this.

Last night was a dreadful... just dreadful... night for R. Sometimes her anxiety ramps up so high that she appears to be psychotic. She certainly acts psychotic. Insomnia, screaming, wandering, you name it. Most unpleasant. It started at about bedtime, and when we said it was time to get in bed, she ramped up immediately. I have mentioned that both her neurologist and I firmly believe that her seizures are not true seizures, but psychogenic ones, caused by extreme anxiety. They look for all the world like tonic-clonic seizures, except I can talk to her and the seizure will stop and she will acknowledge my presence. This is just not possible with a real seizure. Understandably, because of the psychotic aspects of the seizures (and because they were still believed to be true epileptic seizures), the adults around her before us were not anxious to start the seizure/psychotic/anxiety cycle. As a result, she has learned deep inside her head somewhere (I know it's not purposeful) that to complain of eye pain (what has been her typical pre-seizure aura), has had adults scrambling to head it off at the pass. This has been a useful tool in her coping toolbox, but like much coping learned through trauma, is not ideal.

We have decided that we need to take all anxiety and emotion about seizures, impending seizures, medicine, and eye pain completely off the table. At least on our part. Complaints of eye pain are now typically met with statements of, "Gee, that's too bad. I'm sorry. Did you have a bad dream?" or some such statement trying to identify the real cause of what is going on in her head. It is a little disconcerting to her since we are so completely off her typical and expected script for such occasions.

Last night, when she was being particularly difficult, and was even starting to twitch a bit, I matter-of-factly said, "It looks as though you are going to have a seizure. Why don't you tell me when it's done?" And sat and waited.

I'm not really the non-caring parent that this makes me out to be, because here is what happened next. The twitching stopped, she looked at me, and then a torrent of angry, screaming words in Mandarin came out of her mouth while she glared at me. I was pretty darn sure that I was being cussed out in Mandarin.

At about that same time, Y. and H. came into the room to get into bed. Y. hears what R. is saying, she stops, her eyes get really, really big, and she says in a sort of awestruck voice, "Those are really, really bad words." I assured her that I didn't need her to try to translate them for me, at which she looked relieved. (I'm pretty sure that her G-rated existence in English would also make that particular feat pretty impossible.) The whole thing was so ludicrous at that moment, that I was actually laughing. This at least had the effect of stopping the Mandarin swearing from the other bed.

I think (hope) that this all means that the wean really is waking up something inside R.'s head. By not being doped with anti-psychotic drugs and seizure medicine, she is forced to not live in a numb and vacant land. She has to come to terms with her past and present. There has been precious little grieving for China on her part, aside from random statements of missing certain people. But those are usually uttered as a passing comment and then she moves on. Last night, after the swearing, came an endless litany of needing and wanting to go back to China. Angry, demanding, unhappy words. They are the kind of statements which you would expect to have heard about a year ago.

There have been a lot of unpleasant events and emotions that have happened to this child which she has successfully stuffed away, and coping comes through not having to deal with them. The drugs certainly helped, and she still nearly constantly asks for more drugs. I'm afraid that as she loses the veil of cognition-dampening medication, she is going to have to also face the past. I'm sorry that she, in a sense, has to live through it all twice. But I also know that there is no way she can move forward and become as whole a person as she can without doing this hard work. J. and I both hope, though, that the insomnia is not a long-term coping mechanism.
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And for those of you who missed it the first time I linked to it, I have a new article published. It could use a little clicking and sharing love. 4 Times I Wasn't a Perfect Parent and What You Can Learn

Friday, August 25, 2017

Friday bullets, Aug. 25, 2017

Feeling under the weather is not a pleasant way to end the week. Bleh.

  • I did get a huge chunk of school planning done while I was inert on the couch, though. So the time wasn't totally wasted. I can't say I enjoyed the process very much. 
  • As a result of putting so many books on hold, I now have my new library card number memorized. This feels vaguely comforting to me.
  • Olive went to the vet two days ago and had a round of shots. She now weighs 19 pounds... a bit bigger than she was when she came home.
Olive when she first came home

Olive yesterday
  • Kenzie seems to have discovered that Olive is a dog. He wants to know where she is and what she is doing, and has started to play with her. The first few weeks, Kenzie barely acknowledged the puppy's existence.
  • On my list of things I really, really do not like, are textbook publishers. P.'s textbook for her French class is outrageously expensive. Like half the cost of the class expensive. And, you cannot buy a used book, because used books do not come with the precious online code to access the information needed on the internet. Seriously, the book is half the cost of the class. Grrr... she will be instructed, as so many of my children have been, to complain about book cost on the teacher evaluation. Would you believe that several of my children's teachers happened to mention that they had no idea the book was so expensive?! I can't even....
  • We have found a church that I think we are going to try going to for a while. This coming Sunday will be the first time the younger group goes to Sunday School there. (They are so excited. We've been hearing a lot of complaining that they haven't been to Sunday School in a while.) So I went down and met the person in charge last week to get a sense of how things would work with some of our less typical children. All I can say is that we feel so welcomed. Everyone we've met has been excited and accommodating of all of our people. One of the reasons we tried this church to begin with was they had a stated goal of inclusion of people with all different functioning, and that has certainly been playing out in our experience so far.
  • We have all of our new Ikea bookcases up, but I still have yet to sort the piles of books onto them. I don't know why this particular job feel overwhelming. I think it is just the cumulative fatigue of unpacking, combined with that last 5% of a job that is hard to get to. I would like to walk across my bedroom floor without stepping over piles of books.
  • R. is nearly completely weaned off one of her seizure medicines. We will be done with it in one more week. So far, no seizures. She has had a lot of anxiety about not taking the medicine, though. I'm hoping that the increase in shrieking is caused by the beginnings of more cognitive function. Anything new causes her to shriek, so maybe firing neural synapses are making her shriek. Don't pop balloon yet, please. Besides, we still have one more medicine to wean off of.
  • I'm not sure how one goes about prioritizing what to do regarding improvements to the house and land, when you really want to be able to do it all. Do the addition, but don't do the kitchen? Do the addition and kitchen, but don't do the fencing? Stable and fencing, but not kitchen or addition? Which do I want more... a kitchen that doesn't function and makes me unmotivated to cook or the ability to actually own a horse? The answer to any one of these questions changes from moment to moment and day to day. 
  • If we don't do the addition, it will be difficult to ever invite anyone over to eat if we can't be outside. We barely all fit in the current dining room as it is, and I can't figure out how to add anyone else. This is kind of hard for someone who is used to being able to invite as many people over for a meal as I wanted.
  • And finally, the vegetable tally so far this month.

Artichoke - 1

Avocado – 3
Basil - 1
Beans (black) - 2
Beans (navy) – 2
Beets - 1
Bell pepper – 2
Broccoli - 1
Brussels sprouts – 1
Carrots - 3
Cauliflower – 1
Celery - 2
Chickpeas - 1
Chipotle pepper - 1
Corn – 3
Cucumber – 2
Edamame – 1
Eggplant - 1
Escarole – 1
Green beans – 1
Green onions – 1
Jalapeno – 1
Lettuce (iceberg) - 1
Lettuce (leaf) – 4
Lettuce (romaine) – 2
Mushrooms (white button) - 1
Okra - 1
Onion – 7
Peas - 2
Potatoes - 1
Spinach – 1
Swiss chard - 1
Tomato (cherry) – 2
Tomato – 6
Zucchini - 2

Tonight's dinner was a green chicken curry with eggplant. It's pretty easy. Cut up some chicken (I used one package of chicken breasts), cut up some eggplant (I like Japanese eggplant, but I couldn't find it here, so used a couple of regular eggplant). Cook the chicken in a little oil in your skillet. Remove chicken when cooked through. Saute the eggplant for a bit, then add green curry paste (how much will depend on how spicy you like it) and one or two cans or coconut milk (I used two). Add the chicken back in and simmer for a bit. Serve over rice and noodles. If you don't forget, like I did, you can throw some Thai basil on top.


Thursday, August 24, 2017

Geography resources

I'm drowning in books as I plan the school year. It's so bad, we had to eat dinner outside because I have the table covered in books. If the library didn't know who I was before this, they will by the time I'm done. I have put a lot of books on hold. A lot.

So since that is all I can think about, I thought I would share some of the books I've come across that I have found to be worthwhile. (Trust me when I say there are a lot of incredibly dull geography books out there. The world is such an interesting place, it really seems a shame that so many books about different countries are so fantastically dry.)

Here's my short list... so far. I will probably have to do a part 2 after all my books arrive.

My very favorite is Australia to Zimbabwe: A Rhyming Romp Around the World by Ruth Fitts. This book focuses on 26 countries, and does a good job of giving an overview of each one. What I love is that there are lists of resources, from music to film to books, for each country. This one book has made my job significantly easier. Well, at least for the countries we are doing that are in it.

For the ones that aren't in the previous book, I also like The Travel Book: A Journey Through Every Country in the World by lonely planet kids. While it doesn't go into the same level of detail, this book does hit the highlights for every single country in the world. It is particularly useful for countries that publishers don't write books about.

Then we come to the dry, elementary non-fiction category. Those books which are published to cover all the major countries. They tend to look alike and read alike, though I have a hunch that no child has ever read through an entire volume of any of the larger and drier ones. I can be kind of hard on this genre, because I have seen it from the other side. It is difficult to write an interesting book while staying within the publishers exceptionally rigid guidelines. From personal experience, I can tell you it is easier to just stop trying to make it interesting and include words of more than two syllables rather than fight a losing battle. The Midwest is not nearly so dull as the book J. and I wrote would make it out to be. But I digress. Again.

I did find one series that isn't too bad, and I think will be somewhat interesting to read to everyone. It's the It's Cool to Learn About Countries series (Social Studies Explorer), and I have the Vietnam volume right now. It's not too long or indepth for grade school, but it isn't a ten word on a page easy reader book, either. It seems to hit a nice balance. It also has a craft project and a recipe included, which I like. It has volumes which cover quite a few other countries, so that takes care of 10 of our 19. Another series which I will use is called Exploring Countries, and it is more of an easy reader style (marked level 5, so on the high side). There is not as much content as the first series, but not too bad, either, and gives some good content. This series covers 20 countries, and is filling in a few more on my list.

Finally, since I have a lot of people who are on the cusp of reading fluently, I wanted to find some resources that could also double as reading practice. Ready to Read has a level 2 series, called Living in.... [fill in the name of a country]. Each book introduces a child who lives in that country, and they tell about their family, where they live, where they go to school, what they eat, etc. I had G. give a page a try for me today, and she liked it. There are quite a few countries which are covered.

I still have a few books on hold which haven't arrived yet. A couple of these have potential to be useful and interesting. I'll let you know if they pan out. So often a non-fiction book sounds as though it will be fantastic, and the reality is often a little disappointing. It's why I currently have approximately 100 books checked out, and over half will be going back, never to be checked out again. I love libraries. They're free and require zero commitment.
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Edited to add, something is up with Blogger and it won't let me embed Amazon links at the moment. Which means you can't shop through my link at the moment. Unless of course you want to take the time to go back through old posts to a previous link and enter Amazon that way.
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I also forgot to add that I have another article published. Feel free to click and share. Four Times I Wasn't a Perfect Parent and What You Can Learn

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Take me out to the ball game... or enforced family fun

Last night we all went to a Kane County Cougers ball game. It was fan appreciation night, so that meant Free Tickets! Who turns down that? And since the stadium is less than a half an hour away from our house, we decided that everyone would go and it would be a fun family outing. Some older people were not so sure this was their idea of fun, but sometimes we just decide that it is a required family fun time. J. and I were reminded of the ball game trip that J. took the six younger people on last year. Same place, but a lot more involved because of the length of time it took to get there. This was a lot more fun. Plus, the Cougars won... 9 to 1. A slightly closer game might have been a little bit more exciting.

G.

K. and L.

Y.

R.

J. explaining the rules of baseball to D. I was doing the same thing the row behind with TM. It turns out neither of these boys knew how baseball worked. They do now.

D., having done a little research during the game, was filling me in on the likelihood of getting hit with a baseball at a game.

I don't think P. was doing baseball research.

H. with slushie. I briefly thought about calling our little night out an eating, rather than an outing. (Hat tip to Russel Hoban in Best Friends for Frances.) Because the evening was filled with a lot of snacks. Various people would head up to the concession stands, come back with something, and share it. 

G. and L.


A. even came... without Olive, who had to stay at home in her crate.

Y.

H.

D. took some pictures for a while.

We really did watch the game.

What three young people really wanted to do was catch a fly ball. They moved over to the emptier part of the bleachers, where several fly balls had been hit, but... nothin'.


Seventh inning stretch. 

Y. thinking the ball was coming to her.

But it didn't.

It was a fun night spent together, even if no fly balls were caught.
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Vegetable tally

Tonight I needed a fairly easy dinner so we could eat early and get to the game. So, I made homemade hamburger helper. It's pretty easy, and you can vary the ingredients to whatever you want. Here's the general recipe. Chop some vegetables (I used onion, celery, and carrots) and saute them for a bit in some oil. Add about a pound or so of ground beef and brown. Add a can or two of diced tomatoes, some salt and pepper, and I added some marjoram and parsley. In the meantime, cook some egg noodles and drain. Right before I add the meat mixture with the salad mixture, I stir in some frozen peas. Mix everything together, and add some grated cheddar on top. Easy, and generally popular.

Artichoke - 1
Avocado – 3
Basil - 1
Beans (black) - 2
Beans (navy) – 2
Beets - 1
Bell pepper – 2
Broccoli - 1
Brussels sprouts – 1
Carrots - 3
Cauliflower – 1
Celery - 2
Chickpeas - 1
Chipotle pepper - 1
Corn – 3
Cucumber – 2
Edamame – 1
Escarole – 1
Green beans – 1
Green onions – 1
Jalapeno – 1
Lettuce (iceberg) - 1
Lettuce (leaf) – 4
Lettuce (romaine) – 2
Mushrooms (white button) - 1
Okra - 1
Onion – 7
Peas - 2
Potatoes - 1
Spinach – 1
Swiss chard - 1
Tomato (cherry) – 2
Tomato – 6
Zucchini - 2

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